January, 2012

  1. Phish Fan Parents using days left until NYE as counting lesson for children

    January 11, 2012 by TreyAntipasta

    Across the country, as Phish fans gear up for the holidays, the countdown to the first notes of Phish that will be played on December 28th is as enticing as Christmas or Hanukkah. But fans countdown not just to the first present under the tree but also to the first notes from Phish, and it has become a popular method for teaching children of Phish fans to count.

    Jonah Ostrovsky from Merrick, Long Island, has been doing the countdown with his son, Ryan, for the past three months. “I counted back to when there was 100 days left on September 17th and we counted the number using toys and cards or whatever was around, then we drew the number on paper and put it on the wall in his room so he could see the numbers. I’m getting more and more excited as the days countdown. I think he enjoys it too!”

    Ryan, only 6 months old, is far too young to comprehend the intricacies of math, let alone counting from 100 to zero, or even 1 to 10, but the thought that Phish fan parents are taking an important part of their life and making some use of it with their children is reassuring for the next generation.

    Parents are encouraged to count numbers while keeping in mind a child’s cognitive development and focus on numbers 1-10. Counting down the rest of the days left until December 31st, as of the 21st, would yield 10 days and one number to learn each day through repetition, visual aides and counting aloud.

    Younger fans are encouraged to take part in couch tour with their parents all four nights, but keep in mind parents will need to be wary of songs like “Fuck Your Face” and may have to answer questions about “The Meatstick”. However, the dances during “Punch You in the Eye” and “Guelah Papyrus” can introduce a child into the world of Phish in a way children will appreciate for the fun and lighthearted nature of the songs.

    The math concept of “1 for 3, 2 for 5” is encouraged to be taught no earlier than 3rd grade, as the art of making a deal is not understood until age 9.